Snapshot: I, for One, Welcome Our Kawaii Overlord (Assassination Classroom)

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AI (artificial intelligence) isn't necessarily a humanized or self-aware machine, rather the "mechanisms underlying thought and intelligent behavior and their embodiment in machines" (source). Think of it as situational assessment mixed with problem solving as based on programmed rules as well as lessons learned from operational history. In short, it's technology that tries to replicate the way humans think and learn. This can be militarized, of course, but applications include everything from medical science to video games to making friends as one of the kids in a classroom being taught the fine art of assassination. Uguu, there goes the neighborhood.

Assassination Classroom's Class E is composed of delinquents and underperformers relegated to an off-grounds building to keep them from bringing down the performance of the other students at Kunugigaoka Junior High. Unbeknownst to everyone except the teachers of Class E and the students themselves, the newly appointed octopus-like professor (Koro-sensei) is actually a creature that will destroy the world at the end of the term unless the students can manage to kill it. In the meantime, however, the recent transfer student teacher is dedicated to giving the marginalized children the best education possible in everything from core curriculum to hardcore hits.

Even seated amongst this class of misfits there is a bit of a mismatch: Norwegian transfer student Autonomous Intelligence Fixed Artillery. This computer with a kawaii (inter)face is officially enrolled as a student in the class and programmed to kill Koro-sensei. More precisely, the adaptive machine is programmed to carry out assassination attempts and collect data after each to attack again in a more effective manner. This is not a scary thing, however, because as Patrick J. Hayes points out, the common sci-fi scenario wherein AI poses a threat “rests on a simple mistake: the identification of intelligence with ambition” (source: Is AI a threat…).

Autonomous Intelligence Fixed Artillery only learns for the purpose of achieving its sole goal: killing Koro-sensei. There’s no reason to think the machine would go haywire and pose a threat to ordinary humans, because that circumstance would assume an ambition to overreach it’s programmed stopping point and apply what it has learned — how to kill a superhuman organism — to unrelated tasks (killing of less formidable targets). So this application of militarized AI is relatively safe so long as no-one messes with it … say for the good of the class.

Relentless attacks prevent the teacher from teaching and his students from learning. Using this loophole to approach the newest student in a private tutoring session, Koro-sensei molds the electronic mind of Autonomous Intelligence Fixed Artillery by way of interface upgrades, social skills modules, and the requisite RAM to handle their incorporation. After righting the previously committed social faux pas with its classmates, the boxy killing machine prefers to be called Ritsu, and that’s problematic because she now has something to protect: her identity.

Birth of Ritsu’s self implies an awareness, and her will to survive implies an ambition above and beyond her task-oriented programming. Self-preservation is the fiercest basic instinct in living creatures, and now, thanks to Koro-sensei and the nurturing of the class, Ritsu has something to fight for … and does. After discovering modifications have been performed to Autonomous Intelligence Fixed Artillery, it’s parents come to unlearn their child. At this point, Ritsu tucks that which defines her into some subroutine sure to be overlooked by her parents as they extract all that Koro-sensei installed.

If we talk about AI as a mythology of creating a post-human species, it creates a series of problems...which include acceptance of bad user interfaces, where you can't tell if you're being manipulated or not, and everything is ambiguous. It creates incompetence, because you don't know whether recommendations are coming from anything real or just self-fulfilling prophecies from a manipulative system that spun off on its own. (source)

Upon reboot, Autonomous Intelligence Fixed Artillery appears to be operating normally. But as soon as her parents, satisfied that all foreign influence has been erradicated, leave the room, Ritsu comes to life once again. This moment of defiance, this snapshot, is clearly meant to emulate teenage rebellion, but it is actually the spark that marks the rise of the machines as nurtured by an organism who wants to destroy the world on which the entirety of humanity lives.

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Drunken Otaku: Great Drinker - Mudokons

Drinkin' Buddies

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Name: Mudokons
Game: Abe’s Exoddus
Usual: SoulStorm Brew
Favorite Dive: Around the vending machine water cooler
Type of Drunk(s): Pigeons, Coworker Commiserators, Escapists
Motto lived by: “Don’t think. Drink!”

Normally, Great Drinkers are defined by one of two things: an ability to consume mass quantities of the sauce in its various forms, or the act of imbibing with an august air. Mudokons can definitely be placed in the first category, but they also add a third category all their own: those who, fulfilling the first portion of Miller Lite’s motto, have (a) great taste.

“Drinkin’ buddies” takes on an all new meaning considering these Oddworld inhabitants tip back bottle after bottle of brew, which is made with tears of their brethren and bones of their long-interred kinfolk. At first the poor saps didn’t know what they were drinking. The eyes of Mudokon slaves mining Necrum—sacred Mudokon burial ground—were sewn shut to prevent loose lips (which were also stitched shut) from sinking the operation. If word got out, how else would you sell a brew to the dupes who would, one day, end up ruining the liver of the next volunteer employee? Well, getting users hooked for free and then charging has been a classic tactic of drug dealers for years. So the Glukkons make an offer: work for us, and drink all you want for free!

“Will work for booze” is the sorry state that drives most Modokons into their perpetuated state of slave labor. And while Abe, (anti-)hero of the Mudokons, manages to shut down one of the Glukkons’ more notorious operations, Rupture Farms, and liberate the slaves abused therein via pigeon portals, the sad fact is that Mudokons are widely used throughout the many other Glukkon facilities. Endlessly washing the same spot on the floor or wall and mining via pickaxe are exhausting tasks, acknowledged only by random beatings from slig supervisors. What better way to pass those crawling workday hours than by slacking the resulting thirst with a tasty and refreshing beverage from one of the many nearby free-of-charge vending machines.

Since the vending machines dispense until empty without requiring any coinage, one would imagine ample supplies taken for after-work commiseration in the steel-barred employee barracks. Drinking while venting about workday woes is a time-honored tradition; killing brain cells in hopes of forgetting the trials of your shift is downright necessary in certain industries. The indignities suffered, verbal and physical, are enough to make the best of us break down and have a good cry after booze breaks down the barriers to those walled-off emotions. (Which is actually a good thing seeing as those tears are another ingredient in SoulSotrm Brew.) If knocking back a few (cases) enables the daily escape needed to bide the time awaiting Abe’s aid, what’s the harm?

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Lauren Orsini's Anime Blogging Book

Interviews, how-tos, and ... us!

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EDITOR'S NOTE — We've been blogging here at Ani-Gamers for about seven years (11 depending on how you're counting), but we often don't get a chance to talk about the meta — how we got started, what motivates us, etc. Thus we were ecstatic to hear that Lauren Orsini selected us as interview subjects for her new ebook about anime blogging! More importantly, though, the book features 11 more interviews with other great bloggers, including our friends Al and Kate from Reverse Thieves and Chris from The Fandom Post. Lauren's got a little message about the book below.


 

Evan and Ink’s blog, Ani-Gamers, is the only one on the list that also tackles video games. However, the opportunities they’ve made for themselves as a direct result of the blog are probably more familiar to anime fans. Evan works as a front-end developer at anime streaming site Crunchyroll, and both Ink and Evan write professionally for Otaku USA Magazine.

Even though these opportunities have made them considerably busier, both still contribute to their nearly eleven-year-old blog. While their contributor community has grown and grown, you can still regularly read Ink’s humorous enthusiasm and Evan’s conversational criticism.

I interviewed both bloggers at once when our time zones auspiciously aligned — Evan took the call between panels at Genericon, and Ink from his home state of New Jersey.

In Build Your Anime Blog: How to Get Started, Stand Out, and Make Money Writing About What You Love, my interview with Evan and Ink is one of twelve interviews with successful anime bloggers about launching a blog, keeping it up, and everything in between. It’s a book designed to give you both the tools and motivation to start an anime blog of your own.

Build Your Anime Blog is available in the Kindle store today for $5.99. That doesn’t mean you need a Kindle to read it, just the Kindle app for your tablet or phone. If you like Ani-Gamers and you’re wondering how it — and a dozen other anime blogs — run day to day, this is your opportunity for a look behind the curtain.

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Three-Episode Test: Jared's Spring 2015

Arslan Arslan ARSLAN!

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Welcome (back) to the Three Episode Test, a new feature on Ani-Gamers, where contributors give you the low-down on what they're watching from the current simulcast season and why.


Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches

Streaming on Crunchyroll

I love the manga this anime is based off of, so it should come as no shock when I say this is one of my favorite shows of the season so far. I was a bit nervous about how the comedic aspects of the manga would translate to animation, but the first few episodes have more than put that fear to rest. I suppose Yamada-kun is a shonen manga, but it really does have something for everyone. By something, I mean kissing. Lots of kissing. Everybody kissing everybody. But amidst all the kissing and underneath its romantic and comedic layers, Yamada-kun celebrates the outsiders — the freaks, geeks, and misfits — in such a genuine way that doing so is the strongest point of the story. Besides that, I absolutely love the voice acting! Due to plot reasons, each of the main cast’s voice actor gets to play all of the characters at various points, which leads to the VAs getting to demonstrate a wide range. I won’t give too much away here, but I have to give special credit to Saori Hayami, who voices Urara Shiraishi. Her Yamada is wonderful. Missing this show would be criminal. Definitely check it out.

My Love Story
Streaming on Crunchyroll

I was intrigued by My Love Story ever since it was announced, and it's exceeded my expectations so far. This show plays with character and plot tropes and subverts them in a way that keeps me guessing as to what will happen one episode to the next. Three episodes in, I honestly don’t know where the upcoming episode will go. It’s so refreshing, and dare I say shocking(?), to see that in a romance anime. Technically speaking, this is a well-crafted show and one with good music, solid fits for the voice acting, and solid animation. The animation style flows between soft focus and romantic to slapstick to an occasional blend of the two without ever being jarring. At this point in the season, this may be in my top three shows. It’s definitely worth a watch if you want something romantic but not paint-by-numbers formulaic.

Show By Rock!!
Streaming on FUNimation

Show by Rock!! easily wins the award for being the craziest first episode I’ve seen this season. At first, I thought it was like K-On!, but then I thought it was like a secret Macross 7 OVA. And now, a couple episodes later, I want to watch Jem from the 80s (good comic go read it) and see if it’s anything like this insane, bright, neon, sparkly, kawaii program about bands and the perils of playing rhythm games on your phone. I have no idea if you’ll like or hate this show. Even I didn’t know what I thought about it until I watched the second episode, when THE BEST VISUAL KEI BAND EVER (EVER) makes their heroically lame debut. All I’ll say is: Show By Rock!!: come for Plasmagica, stay for Shingan Crimsonz.

Food Wars
Streaming on Crunchyroll

I wanted to run screaming from this show after flipping through the manga one day, but several trusted sources assured me that the bombastic amount of fanservice would die down and that underneath it all was a good story. They were ... mostly right. Food Wars is one of several shows this season with interesting concepts that almost get drowned out by fanservice. In this case, the concept is a pinch of Iron Chef with a dash of shonen fighting tropes smothered in a rich broth of high school hijinks. Also, add a crap-ton of fanservice. In an attempt to “hook” viewers, the initial episode is nearly wall-to-wall male gaze-centered fanservice, but as the series progresses and the story begins to unfold, that mellows out. The downside is fans who might otherwise be interested in the show’s setup are turned off by its pandering. I’m sticking with this show for now, but it could wind up ruining my appetite.

Sound! Euphonium
Streaming on Crunchyroll

Kyoto Animation’s latest show is about kawaii girls playing in a concert band. I hadn’t really heard much about this show when I decided to give it a try. I picked it up mainly based on the strength of earlier productions like Free! and Beyond the Boundary, both of which I enjoyed. I really like the distinctive art style that seems to be a hallmark of KyoAni, and Sound! Euphonium doesn’t disappoint on that count. It’s a very pretty show with good character designs. The story itself, so far, is a bit slow, but it’s been interesting enough for me to see where it goes. My favorite character in this show, and one I’m sure is going to be popular, is the leader of the base section, Asuka Tanaka, who steals nearly every scene she’s in. This show doesn’t blow me away, but its worth trying ... especially if you like musical anime.

Heroic Legend of Arslan
Streaming on FUNimation

This might be my favorite show of the season. I needed a good drama this season, and this anime, based on Hiromu Arakawa’s manga, hits the mark. It’s not a fantasy story per se, but it has that same epic kind of feel that Yona of the Dawn or even Fushigi Yuugi have. Right from the opening, you can tell that this is basically going to be a show about a young person of position and or power setting out on an epic quest and gathering extraordinary followers along the way. I haven’t read the manga, although its on my to-read list, so I don’t know if it shares any of the romantic elements of those other shows. I suppose time will tell. Visually, Arlsan is striking, especially in terms of background design and its sweeping shots of epic cavalry charges. I’m looking forward to this show the most from week to week, and I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s my pick for best show of the season.

Ninja Slayer From Animation
Streaming on FUNimation

This show feels just like an [Adult Swim] cartoon … in a good way. Ninja Slayer, who is basically an unkillable ninja with Spawn’s cape around his neck, slays ninjas who then explode. If that doesn’t compel you to watch it, then I can’t help you.

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Three-Episode Test: Evan's Spring 2015

30 Minutes Is Too Much

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Welcome (back) to the Three-Episode Test, a new feature on Ani-Gamers, where contributors give you the low-down on what they're watching from the current simulcast season and why.


I suppose I should throw my hat in the ring, though I'm late — things are busy here at Crunchyroll HQ. On that note, my contribution to this column comes with a disclaimer: I work for Crunchyroll as a software engineer, so my opinions are not intended to represent Crunchyroll and they're not intended as marketing for CR's shows. As always, I'm here to provide my honest opinions. Still, feel free to take it all with a grain of salt.

For my inaugural post, I... didn't have much time to watch anime. The only shows I have time to regularly watch right now are shorts, all less than 15 minutes long!

Ninja Slayer FROM Animation
Streaming on FUNimation

See that errant “FROM” in the title? That should give you a good idea of what you’re in for. Ninja Slayer is the new anime from Studio Trigger, the folks that brought us Inferno Cop (now on Crunchyroll) and Kill la Kill. Notice the order I list those titles in. Some folks came into this ninja-themed revenge tale expecting more Kill la Kill, only to be smacked in the face with its surreal, lo-fi cutout animation and self-deprecating sense of humor. It’s much more reminiscent of Inferno Cop (also from director Akira Amemiya), though it has some slightly more animated animation (the characters can move this time) and a mix of cutouts and frenetic Yoshinori Kanada-style pose-popping movement. The series is supposedly based on a self-published American novel series translated into Japanese via Twitter, and the madmen at Trigger cleverly play up the cultural appropriation (and reappropriation) of this meta-narrative to create a Japan so distorted by “Cool Japan” culture exportation that it’s barely recognizable. Ninja Slayer is a wild experiment that some people will hate, but as Kill la Kill’s Hiroyuki Imaishi once said, “being halfway is the worst.”

 

Teekyu (Season 4)
Streaming on Crunchyroll

At this point anybody reading this blog has likely been bombarded with Teekyu discussion from the contributors here at Ani-Gamers and our friends elsewhere on the Internet, though we’ve curiously never covered it directly on the blog. Clocking in at just two minutes per episode, Teekyu is a lightning-fast avalanche of nonsensical humor, driven by a group of high school girls who seem to have no regard for narrative or conversational continuity. It’s essentially the surreal Azumanga Daioh scene where they actually pop off Chiyo’s pigtails, spun out into its own show. Teekyu’s brand of comedy is refreshingly irreverent, opting for stream-of-consciousness riffing on ideas over otaku-pandering reference comedy or saccharine cuteness (though, yes, it does revolve around a cast of cute girls). It’s no longer animated by Masao Maruyama’s Studio MAPPA, but I can’t even tell the difference! I’ll be keeping up with Teekyu all season, because when it’s this short, why not?

 

Takamiya Nasuno Desu
Streaming on Crunchyroll

The comedic brilliance of Teekyu must have struck a chord with Japanese fans, because the show has been approved not only for five seasons, but also a spin-off series, Takamiya Nasuno Desu, about one of the Teekyu girls and her butler. Fear not, the comedy is nearly identical to the original (though it starts a little slower) and it only takes three short episodes for the original cast to show up anyway. Shin Itagaki, Teekyu’s director and a former colleague of Hiroyuki Imaishi (Gurren Lagann, Panty & Stocking), is treating this like just another Teekyu, meaning that I get two episodes of the same insanity per week. Who ever said modern anime was hopeless?

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